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Legal Information: Utah

Restraining Orders

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Updated: 
November 19, 2020

What protections can I get in a cohabitant abuse protective order?

In an ex parte protective order, the judge can order that the abuser:

  1. stop committing or threatening to commit domestic violence or abuse and stop harassing you or any family or household member named in the order;
  2. stop calling, contacting, or communicating with you or anyone named in the order in any way, including indirect contact. There is an exception for communication related to any parent-time provisions in the order;
  3. be excluded from (leave) your home;
  4. stay away from your vehicle, home, school, work, place of worship or any other specific place you go to often unless the abuser attends the same school, is employed at the same place of employment, or attends the same place of worship – in that case, the judge cannot order the abuser to stay away from those places but can regulate the abuser’s behavior in those places;
  5. stay away from a family or household member’s vehicle, home, school, work, place of worship or any other specific place your family or household member goes to often unless the abuser attends the same school, is employed at the same place of employment, or attends the same place of worship – in that case, the judge cannot order the abuser to stay away from those places but can regulate the abuser’s behavior in those places;
  6. not purchase, use, or possess a firearm or other weapon specified by the judge Note: To order this, the judge must find that the abuser’s use or possession of a weapon may pose a “serious threat of harm to you”;
  7. give you use of an automobile or any other personal items and order that law enforcement accompany you to your residence to make sure that you are safe while getting possession of these items;
  8. not interfere with or change the your phone, utility or other services;
  9. not use alcohol or illegal drugs before or during visitation; and
  10. not take the children out of Utah.1

An ex parte protective order can also include any of the following:

  1. grant you or another person temporary custody of any minor children you share with the abuser;
  2. order an attorney to be a guardian ad litem for any minor children to represent their interests;
  3. order the respondent to maintain an existing wireless telephone contract or account;
  4. order you and the abuser to provide financial documents at the hearing for a final protective order if you requested child support or spousal support; and
  5. order anything else the judge decides is necessary for your safety and the safety of your family or household members.2

In a full (final) protective order, the judge can order:

  1. all of the protections in numbers 1 through 9 and in numbers 1 through 4, listed above; and
  2. the following additional protections:
    • order your wireless phone provider to:
      • transfer the account from the abuser’s name to yours; and
      • transfer to you any phone numbers that are primarily used by you or by someone with whom you will live while the order is in effect;
    • make arrangements for parenting time, with or without supervision by a third party, or deny parenting time if it is necessary to protect the safety of you or your child;3 and
    • child support and/or spousal support .4

Whether a judge orders any or all of the above depends on the facts of your case.

1 UT ST § 78B-7-603(2); see the temporary protective order form
2 UT ST § 78B-7-603(2)
3 UT ST §§ 78B-7-603(3),(4); 78B-7-117; see the protective order form
4 See UT ST § 78B-7-603(7)